/WHY WOMEN & GIRLS?/

GMSP Foundation supports initiatives that enable women and girls, and thus their communities, to fulfill their potential
Girl

We bring together strategic partnerships with the right vision, skills and resources to facilitate sustainable change

Why Girls
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education

EDUCATION

EDUCATION
Why Girls
In India, Meera is twice as likely to be illiterate than boys her age.
Why Girls

2x

As a young, illiterate bride, Meera’s children are twice as likely to die before they are 5 years old than her friends who went to school.

GMSP work with dynamic partners in India to engage with community leaders and families to keep girls like Meera in school and marrying later.

See Aangan project →

health-sanitation

HEALTH & SANITATION

HEALTH & SANITATION
Why Girls
Now Meera’s daughter, also illiterate, is at risk of being tracked in their local town, where the average price of a sex act is just £3.

GMSP’s partners installed eco-san toilets in an Indian community and found a 15% increase in girls going to school and a 35% increase in family income.

A child dies every 17 seconds from a sanitation related illness
saftey-dignity

SAFETY & DIGNITY

GMSP’s partners in Mumbai educate boys and girls in schools to reduce their risk of sexual abuse, to build their skills to seek help and report cases, and to overcome abuse through psychotherapy support.

Arpan project →

GMSP supports organisations in London that specialise in providing refuge and counselling to minority ethnic women, like Aysha, who are facing violence.

Southall Black Sisters →

economy

ECONOMIC SECURITY

ECONOMIC SECURITY

GMSP works in India with women like Meera to create their own income and build their collective voice by building their access to market, finance and skills through women’s cooperatives.

Manav Sadhana project →

voice-participation

VOICE & PARTICIPATION

VOICE & PARTICIPATION

Aysha, in London, needs help

but does not know
where to get it

Like other black, minority and ethnic (BME) women in the UK, Aysha’s needs are  not understood nor is it deemed appropriate within her community for her to  voice her concerns or to seek external help.

GMSP build evidence and networks to advocate for BME women in the UK. Our partners train public sector works on BME issues and work with women suffering from violence to ensure they understand their rights and have their voices are heard.

attitude

CHANGE IN ATTITUDES

CHANGE IN ATTITUDES
CHANGE IN ATTITUDES
In Meera’s community in India,
54%of men51%of women
believe it is OK for a man to beat his
wife.
GMSP works to challenge social attitudes to prevent gender violence in India and the UK.
We and our partners do this by working in schools to educate boys and girls on healthy relationships.
We also support the use of media to raise awareness of violence against women and the factors that contribute to this global problem.